Shipping pallet furniture: Clever, Clever, Clever

shipping pallet sectional sofa

shipping pallet sectional sofa

shipping pallet table via babble

shipping pallet table via babble

shipping pallet bed

shipping pallet bed

More shipping pallet furniture, via niketalk

More shipping pallet furniture, via niketalk

Outdoor sofa with shipping pallet base

Outdoor sofa with shipping pallet base

I have seen some great examples of upcycling and reuse with wooden shipping pallets over the past couple years and want to share some with you. I’m loving that shipping pallets are almost impossible to ged rid of and now there are uses for them.  I admit that used ones are cause for sanitary and health concerns depending upon what they have been exposed to. However, new ones are relatively inexpensive.  I am imagining that all of the twentysomethings have to be jumping on this trend.

Pretty, pretty home textiles

decorative fabric parasols

decorative fabric parasols

hammock rubyellen on tumbler

hammock rubyellen on tumbler

via the decorista.com

via the decorista.com

doilie window treatment via Free People blog

doilie window treatment via Free People blog

rosehip's crocheted pillow cases

rosehip’s crocheted pillow cases

Manuel Canovas Kazan fabric on sofa

Manuel Canovas Kazan fabric on sofa

porch

from my Bohemian Aesthetic- clever

from my Bohemian Aesthetic- clever

I don’t post often and I usually have a topic from which I don’t deviate. However, I have some randomly clever and pretty home textile products that I would like to share that are light and Springspirational. Although it is Spring, it has not yet sprung in in New England.

Luli Sanchez: The best kept secret in surface design

luli sanchez luli sanchez2 luli sanchez3 luli sanchez5 luli sanchez6 luli sanchez7 luli sanchez8 luli sanchez9 luli sanchez10 luli sanchez11 luli sanchez12 luli sanchez13 luli sanchez14 lulisanchez15I stumbled upon the work of this artist just a few months ago on Pinterest. I saw one abstract painting in blue that looked like a an indigo dye batik fabric. I clicked on the link to her website. I spent the new hour pouring through all of the beautiful watercolor paintings on her site. They can so easily be applied to any end use; fabric, china, greeting card, nail art and anything one can imagine. I am not sure why I have never heard of her and her work.  Peruse the site and read the “About’ and “faq” sections to get a better feel for who she is.

It is rare that I encounter such a talent who has no interest in self-promotion or collaborative efforts. She simply likes to paint. Check out these images and visit her website: http://www.lulisanchez.com/home   I do know know why any home textiles company has not licensed any of these designs for use in home decorating fabrics. Or, maybe they have bought her paintings and used them, but not her name. Help me out here!!!

Lacquered Rattan Peacock chairs: My pick for Spring 2013

Peacock chair vis The Family Love Tree

Peacock chair vis The Family Love Tree

Peacock chair vis The Family Love Tree
The Peacock headboard via The Family Love Tree

The Peacock headboard via The Family Love Tree

I was reading the most recent version of the digital home decor mag AdoreHome.com, which I love, and saw these great peacock chairs and headboards. I flipped for them. They come in an assortment of happy, spring colors.  The web-based store from which they came is The Family Love Tree,  https://thefamilylovetree.com.au/_chairs/peacock-chairs . Unfortunately, it is in Melbourne Australia! So, where the heck  in the U.S. can we find these lacquered versions of rattan chairs that were ubiquitous in the 1980’s?   They would sell like hotcakes!

Classic peacock chair via The Family Love Tree

Classic peacock chair via The Family Love Tree

Are those Chintz fabrics that I see in House Beautiful Feb 2013 issue???

Whose flloral trellis fabric is on that ottoman???

Whose flloral trellis fabric is on that ottoman???

The loveseat fabric is "Les Touches" by Brunschwig & Fils.

The loveseat fabric is “Les Touches” by Brunschwig & Fils.

Sofa fabric by Manuel Canovas for Cowtan & Tout. Curtains are Rose Cumming's "Lace".

Sofa fabric by Manuel Canovas for Cowtan & Tout. Curtains are Rose Cumming’s “Lace”.

Something is happening here. What it is ain’t exactly clear. For years now, most floral fabrics have been in the form of abstract monochromatic one dimensional renderings.  In 2010, I started to see the return of funkier larger scale florals. Svenskt Tenn, Florence Broadhurst and Josef Franc floral fabrics experienced a rennaisance on traditional upholstery frames. In 2011, exotic florals, faunas and insect motifs began appearing on everything from wallpaper to melamine plates. Dorothy Draper projects and her floral fabrics received lots of coverage in the press in 2012 as did the Martinique palm leaf wallpaper that is known widely as the wallpaper throughout The Beverly Hills Hotel. In fact, I am convinced that the coverage of this leafy pattern  helped to catapult the emerald color trend (also Pantone’s choice for 2013 in home furnishings).

I developed an appreciation for chintz fabrics in the 1990’s when working for Robert Allen Fabrics. I was given resposibility for a stepchild division that the company somehow acquired. The company was based in a suburb of London and produced printed cotton chintz fabrics that were derived from documents. The company sold fabrics under its own brand as well as produced fabrics that became exclusives for many of the reknowned traditional textile companies. I initialy struggled with the designs because they seemed stuffy and oddly colored.  Over the next few years, I realized that I had become completely smitten with them. I have actually been missing them and awaiting their re-emergence. Apparently, the time is now.

I believe that chintz has legs , but that it has to be used is small doses for the average person to enjoy it.  Chintz everywhere in a room is a bit too overwheling for 2013. Sure, Mario Buatta and Ann Pyne can pull it off for their clients, but they are the exception.

Martinique wallpaper used int eh Beverly Hills Hotel

Martinique wallpaper used in The Beverly Hills Hotel

Lily Pulitzer chintz fabric on chair through One King;s Lane

Lily Pulitzer chintz fabric on chair through One King’s Lane

Made in Italy by Kartell, the Mademoiselle upholstered armchair

Made in Italy by Kartell, the Mademoiselle upholstered armchair

Wasting my day away with felted wool and crochet

It is Sunday and, aside from grocery shopping and a load of laundry, I have  gone completely berserk looking at beautiful images of crocheted and  felted wool upcycled bedding accessories. It all started with one quick pin onto Pinterest. I don’t know what happened next, but I stumbled upon someone’s pin of a printed floral pillow case with a sweet scalloped crocheted edge. The image was from Rosehip.typepad. So, I went to this blog and FELL IN LOVE with it. It was full of all of the beautiful home goods that I imagine having all over my home that bring peace of mind and a coziness that is hard to feel during winter in New England. I realize that I posted a few years ago about felted wool  and crocheted goods, but I think it is time to revisit the topics because the slow, homespun movement is much more embraced today than when I posted about the trends a few years ago.  (Patchwork With  A Punch: April 2009 and Felted Wool: A Party Waiting To Happen: April 2009, crochet Anyone?: June 2009

wool scrap patchwork bedcover via Rosehip.typepad.2

wool scrap patchwork bedcover via Rosehip.typepad.2

)   Check out these wonderful specimens.

Sweet felt goods blanket

Sweet felt goods blanket

Sweatercoats, cloaks and ponchos

Vintage reversible poncho/cape on ebay. (Don't bother looking for it. I bought it.)

Vintage reversible poncho/cape on ebay. (Don’t bother looking for it. I bought it.)

Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Designer Collaborations via FFFFOUND

Hudson’s Bay Company Point Blanket Designer Collaborations via FFFFOUND

Poncho by SHELLEY via Oakliesfashions.com

Poncho by SHELLEY via Oakliesfashions.com

Bavarain reversible poncho/ cape on ebay

Bavarain reversible poncho/ cape on ebay

sweetandblue upcycled teen sweatercoat on etsy

sweetandblue upcycled teen sweatercoat on etsy

sweetandblue upcycled clothing on etsy

sweetandblue upcycled clothing on etsy

enlightened platypus upcycled sweatercoat on etsy

enlightened platypus upcycled sweatercoat on etsy

Mermsid mushroom upcycled sweatercoat on etsy

Mermsid mushroom upcycled sweatercoat on etsy

I am a sucker for all of these in the winter. I love to layer, but I love feeling unencumbered, too. Here are some terrific images.

Marimekko: 60 Years of Happy, Modern Textiles

Both of these Marimejjo dresses are from 1966!!

Both of these Marimejjo dresses are from 1966!!

These caftans were created by Marimekko designer Liisa Suvanto in 1974.

These caftans were created by Marimekko designer Liisa Suvanto in 1974.

Another gorgeous creation by Annika Rimala for Marimekko in 1954. Do you recall what most women wore in the States in 1954?

Another gorgeous creation by Annika Rimala for Marimekko in 1954. Do you recall what most women wore in the States in 1954?

All three of these simple shift dresses are from 1965 and were designed by the very talented Marimekko designer Annika Rimala.

All three of these simple shift dresses are from 1965 and were designed by the very talented Marimekko designer Annika Rimala.

I picked up and started flipping through a Marimekko book that was given to me in 2005 by the U.S. distributor of Marimekko at that time. The book is “MARIMEKKO  Fabrics Fashion Architecture”. It recounts the history of the Finnish textile company. The pictures are gorgeous. What really strikes me as impressive is how timeless both the textile patterns and the apparel that they produced are. I looked at the images of models in Marimekko garb and felt as though the models’ haircuts and clothing could beasily be worn today and still look fresh and timely.

Home fashion trends of 2012 : Veni, Vidi, Vici.

Hermes throw

Hermes throw: There is nothing better than paying a company lots of money to become one of its brand ambassadors.

Typographic-Pillows
Typographic pillows. I guess I should leave.
Floral print kantha throw
This exact floral print kantha throw which is on every flash sale site and in every other catalog.
Greek key fabric.

Greek key fabric. The karate chopped pillow continues to remain timeless.

chevron pattern
Chevron pattern: Although I find it timeless, this pattern is on everything.
poufs
Poufs, not just Moroccan ones. Do people really utilize them?
Vintage typewriter on a stack of vintage suitcases. Very cute, but everywhere.
Vintage typewriter on a stack of vintage suitcases. Very cute, but everywhere.

It is always fun to take a look at what themes, colors and objects were prevalent during a calender year. Without putting a huge amount of thought into this, I would like to simply display images of trends that have been BAMM,right in my face this year, both in magazines as well in blogs. I find it interesting that so many of us embrace  fresh style, it becomes ubiquitous and then that fresh style causes a numbness or lack of reaction in us.  So, these are just some of the images that have lost their freshness for me.

Monogrammed trays

Monogrammed trays, mongrammed anyting, melamine trays, too

bar cart Style by Emily Henderson
bar cart, Style by Emily Henderson. It’s not that I don’t LOVE the look or oddly yesteryear notion of getting banged up one weekday afternoon…

Cliche
Cliche. The Hermes throw, chevron and typography all in one room.

Japanese Kasuri Ikat: The Object of My Affection

kasuri inspired china from Global Table

Kasuri inspired rug House To Home UK
Kasuri inspired rug House To Home UK

kasuri  zafus via Dharma Trading

kasuri pillow
kasuri pillow
Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1970's
Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1970’s

Along with shibori, I have grown to love kasuri and have recently seen  high-end china and area rugs that use interpretations of kasuri patterns in the indigo colorway. ‘Maybe an emerging trend? So, what is kasuri?

In Japan, this double ikat technique (warp and weft resist dye) is known as kasuri. Before dyeing, sections of yarn are tightly bound in predetermined lengths. The dye does not penetrate these protected areas when the thread is dipped into the dye bath. The binding is then carefully removed leaving yarn that is partly white and partly colored. The threads are then used as the warp or weft so a pattern appears as the cloth is woven. The slight misalignment of threads gives the pattern on the kasuri cloth its characteristic ‘fuzzy’ outline. The dyer must have great skill to bind the threads in just the right place so the pattern emerges as planned. The patterns are all symbolic . Japanese kimonos are often made from the bingo kasuri fabric.

Having 300 years in its history, Kasuri is designated as a traditional craft which is very rare in Japan. The beautifully woven patterns come out from the joint effort of wisdom and technique of weaver who can foresee the pattern on finished product at the phase of space-dyeing. The natural touch and indigo blue of the Kasuri fabric is pleasing to the minds of the Japanese people. Most vintage kasuri fabric is taken from dismantled kimonos are handwoven using natural indigo dyes. However, new kasuri is typically machine woven using synthetic dyes.  Kasuri yarns can be wool, linen or cotton. The fabric typically need to be washed at least 3 or 4 times to remove residual dyes that bleed off the fabric.

Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1950’s

African wax print umbrellas: Both Beautiful and Ethical

Joyaux Marisol Amara_Ochre_joyaux marisol Rufaro_joyaux marisol Dayo_PinkAs the About Us section of their website reads:

Marisol™-brand umbrellas are designed to protect women not only from rain and sunshine, but from violence and war. A portion of proceeds helps the women of the Democratic Republic of Congo to rebuild their lives at the City of Joy, a revolutionary healing and training center created by women on the ground and sustained by V-Day, a worldwide activists’ movement to end violence against women. http://drc.vday.org.

They come with a hefty price tag at $315 each, but they are are all limited addition African wax print fabrics and a portion of the proceeds are donated. They are truly beautifl with their energetic prints and signature teardrop handles. Check them out at http://www.marisols.org/site/

Peshtemals, Pestemals, Foutas, Turkish Towels- Maximum bang for the buck

hammam towel as tablecloth

hammam towel as tablecloth

peshtemal as sarong

turkish towel as a scarf
turkish towel as sarong
Certified organic cotton Turkish pestemals
Certified organic cotton Turkish pestemals

You might not know what these are. These are towels that have been used in the hammams or spas in Turkish baths for ages. They are hand loomed from cotton, linen or bamboo yarns in both Turkey and Tunisia ( although referred to only as foutas in Tunisia). They have fringed or tasselled edges, are extremely lightweight and are a plain weave without a terry loop pile. What makes them worthwhile?  Since they are lightweight, they dry very quickly. They also take up very little room in a bag, make a great travel blanket, transition from a towel to a sarong to a head turban and they keep motoring into other end uses such as a tablecloth, window treatment or bed throw.

Pestemals have long been popular in the Turkish spas and Western Europeans have embraced them along the Mediterranean. This past year, I have noticed more U.S distributors popping up with them at trade shows for retailers. I’ve seen them touted in travel and shelter mags as well as interiors blogs. I’m just not sure if they have become familiar to many people.  I’m betting that they will really catch on next Spring.  Some are woven more tightly and are meatier than others. I find that the bamboo ones tend to be the lightest. But,they all work!!!

Here are some in action.

Yarn Bombing- The Newest Street Graffiti

yarn bombed phone booth

yarn bombed bike
yarn bombed bike
yard bombed house

Okay, I admit that I was a bit slow to learn about this creative, festive trend that is happening on the streets in cities and towns around the world. I first stumbled upon a few pictures back about six months ago while looking at Google images. I was completely enamored with what I saw. People had taken the mundane and age-old domestic skills of knitting and crocheting and reapplied them to the unlikeliest of products- trees, bicycles, phone booths, furniture and public fixtures. Explosions of color and cleverness.  It was just about three months ago when I learned the term for this and it is referred to as yarn bombing.

Street graffiti artists have typically been predominantly male, so this trend really resonates with me since knitting is most commonly a craft performed by women.  I love the idea of a bunch of renegade female knitters sneaking into public parks late at night to cover statues and tree trunks in pretty knitted cloaks. And, let’s face it, knitting, crocheting and sewing were dying crafts until recent years when 20 something year olds began to embrace the crafts again. So, yarn bombing in such an in-you-face way to coerce people to once again embrace these crafts.

Check out some of these impressive works of art.

I was listening to NPR one day last week and heard the end of an interview with an author of a book about yarn bombing.

Operation C.H.A.I.R. from Colorful Senses

yarn bombed trees
yarn bombed trees

Splatter, splash, scribbles spill into home furnishings

Big, bright buffalo checks and ginghams

gingham canopie from Coastal LivingThere is no shortage of clean, bright Palm Beach preppy fabrics and home furnishing accents today. Monogramming,  awning stripes,  nautical motifs such as the sea horse and coral, Greek keys and the great new Lily Pulitzer fabric collection through Lee Jofa are a la mode.  Going hand in glove, I am seeing in soft home furnishings the classic, timeless buffalo plaid.   But, it has a new attitude though. It is larger scaled and bolder, taking center stage. I am seeing the predictable color combos of red and white as well as black and white and they are dramatic. However, I am also seeing brights with white and they clean and modern.   I’m liking them!

 

gingham outdoor chair by Alfred Sungbuffalo plaid canopy and bed

Fun upholstery with Mexican Otomi embroidered tenangos

EdenThe-Tenango-Chair3 Studio 180EdenThe-Tenango-Chair2 from Studio 180PPCh_Tenango_3  Prickly Pair Chairs

I still wish Pantone had chosen indigo blue for 2012.

I picked up the March issue of U.K.’s Elle Decoration a couple of weeks ago. The cover photo was of an inspiring blue living room. Inside, they declared blue as the color of the moment. They proceeded to give their explanation as well as share five pages of spreads that were calming and beautiful, all with cobalt, indigo and nautical blue accessories and furnishings. It was hugely impactful.

Every January, I try to guess which color and cast Pantone will choose for its top trending color in home furnishing for the new year. Most every year, I am wrong. I did guess that a bright yellow would be it for 2010, but the name MIMOSA didn’t reflect what I was visualizing. I saw a robin’s egg blue as the upcoming hue for 2011. Again, I was wrong. But, not completely off.

If anyone had given me 15 guesses for 2012, I never would have picked Tangerine Tango. I might have entertained it in 2010. It’s a fun and vibrant color in small dollops, but I struggle with it as a major color for 2012. Okay, so back to Elle Decoration. I just want to share how well I felt that the editor for Elle Decoration expressed their reason for exalting the blues at this time. I’d like to just share a few of the following pages from the issue with you. You tell me if they feel as relaxing and fresh to you as they do to me.

If it weren’t already obvious, I really don’t know how to use wordpress. So, I am adding a couple other photos at the bttom that  are not from Elle Decoration. I just have no idea how to add text after I upload the images. I’m sure it is easy, but my mind is a bit rigid. (The microwave is still magic to me.) Holy crap. This sentence managed to jump between the Ellec Decoration images.  I need a tutorial.

Elle Decoration UK march 2012 coverElle Decoration march 2012Elle Decoration blue p2 Elle Decoration p.3Elle Decoration March 2012- blue

Graphic digitally printed home furnshings fabrics make big statements.

digitally printed floral pillow by Bluebell GrayDigitally printed Audrey fabric chair- Name Design StudioDigital printing on fabric and wallpaper  for production and not just samples and signs has become much more popular as a choice for production runs and customizing home furnishings.  I have noticed the trends in home furnishing fabrics towards using photographs and hughe designs ( which could never have been achieved with rotary screen printing or flatbed printing). Following are just a few of the fun pieces that I’ve seen over the last couple years that take complete advantage of the ability that only digital textile printing can provide.

Pixel couch made by Kvadrat and sold through Morosodigitally printed fabric for bed by chair-couturedigitally printed fabric on Anthropologie sofadigitally printed upholstery fabric- Blu Girl Art

Upholstering with rugs, blankets and wall hangings

vintage blanket ottomans- Amsterdam Modern

vintage blanket ottomans- Amsterdam Modern

serape covered ottoman
serape covered ottoman
Bridal rug upholstered sofa from Wisteria
Bridal rug upholstered sofa from Wisteria
blanket upholstered chairs via The Chair Repository blogspot
classic Hudson Bay blanket upholstered ottoman via Apartment Therapy
Vintage blanket chair from alltheluckintheworld.nl

Not completely new, but worth taking a quick look at , is the trend of using pliable natural fiber blankets, rugs and tapestries as upholstery fabric.  NOt much explanation is required here. We’ve been seeing the vintage suzanis and kilims used as such for a few years now. However, I am starting to see more blankets, dhurries and vintage serapes being used. Some of the most interesting choices involve a modern frame with a traditional ethnic rug and vice-versa.  Here are just a few pics I got from Google images.

Investor fervor for flash sale sites soars.

This is not an article from The Onion.

I just read in Home Textiles Today today that another flash sale site devoted to offering home furnishings went live yesterday. This is the last straw in terms of  my understanding why these are hot investments or how the models are sustainable.  LuxeYard, out of Los Angeles, went live yesterday as a result of getting $3.5 million financing from private investments. Oh, and by the way, I went onto the site, became a member and clicked on a link to see the offerings.  The link was broken.  The site didn’t work. I actually feel sad for them already.

Following is the exact text from HTT:

According to the company, LuxeYard updates the flash sale model by introducing two new e-commerce processes: Concierge Buying and Group Buy. The flash sales website at www.luxeyard.com claims that these concepts shift the pricing and sourcing power from retailers to consumers, by allowing consumers to influence featured products and final prices.

With Concierge Buying, LuxeYard members can request items they would like to purchase at discounted price by posting photos to one of LuxeYard’s social media platforms, which includes Facebook and Twitter. LuxeYard will then source the most popular product as determined by user votes, or a comparable or higher quality product, and offer it on the website at what it says is a fraction of a comparable retail price.

Group Buy allows LuxeYard members to leverage social media to encourage other users to purchase a featured product, which drives product prices down for featured Group Buy items.

Everyone who purchased the Group Buy Item will pay the final lowest price. For example, a member may purchase an item for $100, share the information on Facebook encouraging others to buy the same product, and two days later find out that customer demand pushed the price down to $50. That would result in the original purchasing member only paying the end price of $50.

“Our team identified a significant hole in the explosive flash sale marketplace, realizing the customer experience was not interactive, community-driven or personalized,” said Braden Richter, CEO of LuxeYard. “We empower consumers with our Concierge Buying concept, shifting the sourcing of goods to the consumer. LuxeYard is combining the best of a flash sale with a unique e-commerce platform and an engaging interactive community.”

I do not understand this business model. If they are selling highly desirable branded goods, why would the supplier sell them product at $.20 cents on the dollar and drop ship every item to individual consumers.    That doesn’t sound reasonable if the brand cares about its brand.   We all understand supply and demand as well as the power to negotiate better prices, but we aren’t talking about widgets here.

Following are some of the other bells and whistles that differentiate LuxeBrand from the other flash sales and bring it into an arena that smacks of Open Sky. (The difference is that OpenSky doesn’t beat up its vendors, dillute the brands, force brands into value-engineering cheaper product and OPen Sky actually purchases and ships the inventory from its own distribution center.)

 LuxeYard also features these tools:

• LuxeLife Trendsetters – A community of design professionals provides design curation and offers aesthetic insights, product recommendations and special events exclusively for LuxeYard members. Members may ask the community questions and receive product recommendations. Some of the founding LuxeLife Trendsetters include Nicky Hilton, Daniella Clarke, Faye Resnick, Bobby Berk, Amanda Rosbrook and Forbes Riley.  (Oh, like OPenSky?)

• Room Planner – Allows consumers to enter room dimensions and/or upload a photo of the room in which they’d place a product they’re considering, to get a sense for how the item fits with the current décor and layout before purchasing. ( If someone is struggling over a picture frame and requires such a tool then good luck getting them to buy a throw pillow or vase.)

• LuxePop – Allows members to shop at LuxePop stores from their own homes. (I don’t even know what LuxePop is, but we can shop just about anywhere from out homes these days.)

LuxeYard says it offers members home furnishings and décor at up to 70% off standard retail prices. According to a press release from the company, LuxeYard does not hold inventory; manufacturers ship products directly to consumers. (Well, this is why investors love the idea, not why the suppliers and customers will.)

 I read of two others that went live last week. Oh, and I am not that well road. So, how many are launching every week? I also have read repeatedly about some of the original ones such as Gilte Group and One King’s Lane continuing to get (what seems to me to be) ridulous amounts of investment money. My assumption is the allure of  a company’s generating revenue without buying inventory or having to staff a distribution facility is what is creating such a fervor, or fever.

I rarely use my blog to do anything but show home textiles that I find refreshing and desirable to my non-existent followers.  I apologize for my tone with this post.  I am stymied by the flash sale site hysteria.  I am a member of  two handfuls. I was curious in the beginning. I have purchased four items from four different sites in the past and I wasn’t happy with the quality of any of the product. Not only that, I had never heard of any of the brands.  I continue to become a emmber of the new ones just to see if any are offering something truly unique, high quality, covetable and to check prices.  The merchandise is all starting to look the same and I wonder if I am seeing a more rapid maturation of the TJX brick and mortar business model.  I can’t tell the difference between TX Maxx and Marshalls and, with 1000’s of stores, there aren’t enough last season or end of season merchandise to fill their stores.  So, branding, royalty agreements and private label programs seem to have become the new way at TJX. They even seem to by the defunt brand names and resurrect them.  The only problem for true value seekers is that the quality is often inferior. TJX isn’t what it was. It has kicked butt year after year and has experienced growth during the recession ( no small task), but it isn’t my go to place for high quality branded merchandise anymore. 

A couple thoughts and questions. Has the investment world become crazily, stupidly in love with the business model? Is this model even sustainable?What are your thoughts regarding flash sale sites?  Do they diminish the brand?  Do they have staying power?o you see just a few strong sites as the remaining survivors?  PLease educate me. 

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