kasuri inspired china from Global Table

Kasuri inspired rug House To Home UK
Kasuri inspired rug House To Home UK

kasuri  zafus via Dharma Trading

kasuri pillow
kasuri pillow
Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1970's
Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1970’s

Along with shibori, I have grown to love kasuri and have recently seen  high-end china and area rugs that use interpretations of kasuri patterns in the indigo colorway. ‘Maybe an emerging trend? So, what is kasuri?

In Japan, this double ikat technique (warp and weft resist dye) is known as kasuri. Before dyeing, sections of yarn are tightly bound in predetermined lengths. The dye does not penetrate these protected areas when the thread is dipped into the dye bath. The binding is then carefully removed leaving yarn that is partly white and partly colored. The threads are then used as the warp or weft so a pattern appears as the cloth is woven. The slight misalignment of threads gives the pattern on the kasuri cloth its characteristic ‘fuzzy’ outline. The dyer must have great skill to bind the threads in just the right place so the pattern emerges as planned. The patterns are all symbolic . Japanese kimonos are often made from the bingo kasuri fabric.

Having 300 years in its history, Kasuri is designated as a traditional craft which is very rare in Japan. The beautifully woven patterns come out from the joint effort of wisdom and technique of weaver who can foresee the pattern on finished product at the phase of space-dyeing. The natural touch and indigo blue of the Kasuri fabric is pleasing to the minds of the Japanese people. Most vintage kasuri fabric is taken from dismantled kimonos are handwoven using natural indigo dyes. However, new kasuri is typically machine woven using synthetic dyes.  Kasuri yarns can be wool, linen or cotton. The fabric typically need to be washed at least 3 or 4 times to remove residual dyes that bleed off the fabric.

Indigo cotton kasuri fabric from 1950’s

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